Adlog


AWESOME stationary created for NBC’s action/suspense channel 13th Street by Jung von Matt AG, Germany.

AWESOME stationary created for NBC’s action/suspense channel 13th Street by Jung von Matt AG, Germany.

Image

4 years ago

Tagged: DDB advertising FedEx

Interesting guerilla work done by DDB Brazil for FedEx.

Interesting guerilla work done by DDB Brazil for FedEx.

Image

4 years ago

Tagged: advertising frontline guerilla

I’ve shared this ad in many of my classes, as it still continues to be one of my favorite examples of great guerilla advertising.

I’ve shared this ad in many of my classes, as it still continues to be one of my favorite examples of great guerilla advertising.

I am a strong believer that Nike’s relatively new commercial featuring Tiger with a voiceover from his father was a GREAT commercial despite its intensity. It provided Tiger the opportunity to face the general public and apologize without necessarily bringing the controversy up again. He provided consumers with a different angle on the issue; through the use of his father’s voice, he harnessed the emotions that he feels and portrayed that to millions of people without saying a single word.

Image

4 years ago

Tagged: Apple iAd advertising media iPhone

According to Apple:
"iAd is a breakthrough mobile advertising platform from Apple. With it, apps can feature rich media ads that combine the emotion of TV with the interactivity of the web. For developers, it means a new, easy-to-implement source of revenue. For advertisers, it creates a new media outlet that offers consumers highly targeted information."
Sounds too good to be true, right? Without seeing it in action, I have a hard time imagining minuscule ads on my iPhone being as emotionally powerful as Google’s search stories or Nike’s recent commercial featuring Tiger and a voiceover of his father.
However, I can see advertisers taking advantage of the iPhones numerous features to encourage interactivity with consumers. The touch-sensitive glass screen alone could provide endless possibilities for ads; it could allow consumers to physically interact with a brand in a million different ways. Solving puzzles that reveal travel discounts, playing games with candy bars, even using the iPhone’s accelerometer to drink a bottle of Coca-Cola are just some of the new interactions with brands we may be about to see.
But here is my million dollar question: Will this new ad platform become so popular and widely (ab)used that it pisses me off as a veteran iPhone user? I’ve relied on my trusty iPhone every since my first one, the first generation iPhone with the brushed metal back. Not once have I been bombarded with obnoxious ads in any of the apps I have chosen to download. Will the prospective profit be so appealing to developers that it becomes abused, and will it become something we see in every single app, paid or unpaid? I certainly hope not.

According to Apple:

"iAd is a breakthrough mobile advertising platform from Apple. With it, apps can feature rich media ads that combine the emotion of TV with the interactivity of the web. For developers, it means a new, easy-to-implement source of revenue. For advertisers, it creates a new media outlet that offers consumers highly targeted information."

Sounds too good to be true, right? Without seeing it in action, I have a hard time imagining minuscule ads on my iPhone being as emotionally powerful as Google’s search stories or Nike’s recent commercial featuring Tiger and a voiceover of his father.

However, I can see advertisers taking advantage of the iPhones numerous features to encourage interactivity with consumers. The touch-sensitive glass screen alone could provide endless possibilities for ads; it could allow consumers to physically interact with a brand in a million different ways. Solving puzzles that reveal travel discounts, playing games with candy bars, even using the iPhone’s accelerometer to drink a bottle of Coca-Cola are just some of the new interactions with brands we may be about to see.

But here is my million dollar question: Will this new ad platform become so popular and widely (ab)used that it pisses me off as a veteran iPhone user? I’ve relied on my trusty iPhone every since my first one, the first generation iPhone with the brushed metal back. Not once have I been bombarded with obnoxious ads in any of the apps I have chosen to download. Will the prospective profit be so appealing to developers that it becomes abused, and will it become something we see in every single app, paid or unpaid? I certainly hope not.

Video

4 years ago

Tagged: old spice dove advertising marketing

It seems like the men’s toiletries industry is taking a new position on their branding… and it’s all about being a man. While many will argue the industry has been doing this forever, I believe it has always been subliminal and never taken as a major position. This major positioning declaration of “being a man” is so simple that I cannot believe (to the best of my knowledge) that it hasn’t been utilized before. What’s even more ironic is that Old Spice had already been taking the same position with a very successful and humorous ad featuring the “man your man could smell like”.

Watch Old Spice’s hilarious commercial here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=owGykVbfgUE

Given the success of this unique selling position and its popularity with male consumers, how long will it be until all other men’s toiletry brands adopt a similar position… how long will it be before this unique selling position is no longer unique?